F is for Florida

April 7, 2015 Blog Hop, News & Events 0

Life in Land of IS

Life in Land of IS

ISBN: 9780983887959
Life in the Land of IS tells the amazing story of Lani Deauville, a woman the Guinness Book of Records lists as the World's Longest Living Quadriplegic. Lani is also a woman who believes in IS. "Yesterday is gone and tomorrow is yet to be," she says, "but IS is now and it’s the truth of reality."

Overview

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Literary Awards for Life in the Land of IS –

FPA President Book Award Gold Medal
Royal Palm Literary Award

Praise for Life in the Land of IS –

It has taken me a little bit to process this review in my head. I finished the book a couple of days ago, yet feel really “blessed” that it came into my life at this particular moment. I also needed time to process the feelings that naturally come with it. I had been in a pretty rough spot and this book just gave me a “things that make you go hmmmm” moment. Although, I am not a religious person, I am a spiritual one, and one can’t but help (or at least I can’t) the timing of when this book popped up for me. Lani Deauville is a woman who not only overcame a whole new level of adversity that most people cannot even begin to imagine in their lives, she managed to lasso it and make it work for her, always remaining positive, even when faced with some monumental obstacles which came into her life. Makes one truly wonder about the little pebbles that we consider to be boulders in our lives!

My favorite LD quote in the book: “The worst handicap you can have is a lack of belief in yourself!”

The other reason that this was a 5 star read for me was the manner in which it was written was that I felt like Lani was actually speaking to me and telling me her story vs. it being written by an author. Although, it is basically a biography, it is written as though it is a memoir. I don’t think the book could pack quite the punch it did for me had it been written as a biography.

Third, I loved this author’s work in her book, Spare Change. I have found very few authors can venture out of their comfort zone with genres that they write in. Ms. Crosby has done this beautifully. – Naomi Blackburn, Author CEO

Read an excerpt from Life in the Land of IS Discussion Questions for Life in the Land of IS

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Email: betteleecrosby@gmail.com

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Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the page above are "affiliate links." This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

F is for Florida

The life I’m now living began in Southern Florida on a sweltering summer day, when the air was thick with humidity and my skin prickled with restlessness. It was June 2, 1958; two days after I’d strutted across the stage, a finalist in the New Smyrna Beach Beauty Pageant, and three days before I’d planned to wear the new prom gown hanging in the closet. I was seventeen , the age when sitting still is impossible, boredom worse than death, and a new adventure lurking around every corner. After spending over a year in New York, I’d returned to Daytona searching for something—freedom perhaps, or that magical stimulus that would quicken my heartbeat and send challenge pulsing through my veins.

At the age of fifteen, I had been allowed to go to Manhattan to attend the Semple Finishing School for Girls; but after a month of rather ridiculous curfew restrictions and listening to the same etiquette lessons Mother had preached from the time I was born , I moved out. My first thought was the Barbizon Plaza, an exclusive hotel for women . For a while it looked as though I might be accepted, but once they discovered I was not yet sixteen, I received a polite no. It was the same story with several other women’s hotels; apparently a fifteen year old girl was something no one wanted as their responsibility. In desperation, I turned to my brother Scott, who was married to a Jewish woman. She pulled a few strings and got me into a Jewish Women’s Hotel. If I were to stay in New York, it seemed to be my only option.

After being told repeatedly that I should work as a model, and equipped with few marketable talents other than my good looks, I decided to give modeling a shot. It was at a casting call that I met the three gay men, also models, who would ultimately become my best friends and protectors. We struck up a conversation and when they learned my age, Sam said, “Fifteen! What’s a girl your age doing in New York alone? Do

you even realize the dangers of this business? Some agencies issue a call for models , but they’re not really looking for models! Get involved in something like that, and you could end up in serious trouble.” The other two agreed. “We’ve got a spare room,” Robert said , “You can move in with us and we’ll get you to the legitimate agencies.” Within the week, I left the hotel and moved in with my new friends.

True to their word, they guided me to the right places, recommended me to the agencies they knew, convinced me to ‘fudge’ my age and helped me find a reasonably steady stream of work which I supplemented with a job at a Greenwich Village coffee house. Day after day I slid my body into the latest fashions and smiled at the camera, a picture of serenity on the outside, but inside the seed of restlessness was starting to sprout. I smoked, I drank, I dated young men who were sometimes older than was appropriate, and I partied, all while my gay friends watched over me like mother hens. New York was fun, but it was a city— the streets crowded with people, remnants of trash tossed about, the only trees brass-potted saplings struggling for survival in front of luxury hotels. Dogs that should have been free to race across endless stretches of grass were forced to pee in the gutter. The handful of horses that clip-clopped through Central Park seemed weary of both tourists and traffic. On days when I wasn’t working, I’d be lying in the grass in Central Park, looking up at the clouds and wishing I was back in the Tomoka Game Reserve. I knew New York wasn’t the place I wanted to spend my forever. Modeling for the Macy’s Catalog and for a wholesale furrier was not the glamorous life I had anticipated. Somewhere there was a real life waiting for me, a life with an exciting career and freedom poking out of its pockets. It was out there and my name was written on it, but it was going to be up to me to find it.

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